Get Behind Michael Maynard’s Gorilla Picking

Posted by: Mona Category: Lock Picking, News Post Date: 13/06/2019

Get Behind Michael Maynard’s Gorilla Picking

Many of you will be familiar with MH Maynard and his amazing gorilla lock picking skills. Here at PickPals, we thought we’d get to know him a little bit better with a little interrogation of our own.

We put out any questions you may have to the Australian Lock Sport Guild and got some great questions that we put to Michael.

The answers are great reading and inspiration for your picking.  Like how Michael learnt to pick, his favourite locks to pick and where the future of security is heading.

Lets get to the questions…

I like Mul-T-Locks in general, and the Mul-T-Lock MT5+ in particular, no doubt about it. I love the precision that pin-in-pin dimple locks demand, and  Mul-T-Locks are the best of all of the brands available – they are engineered to amazingly fine tolerances so there’s just no room for error. The MT5+ has the sidebar as well so to beat that thing you need to be incredibly precise with both pin in pin dimple picking AND sidebar slider picking. The other thing I really like about picking dimple locks is that dimple picks are amazingly personal – you can’t just buy one and start picking.

 You have to go through a process of buying and modifying commercial picks until you find the shape that works for you, and I really enjoy that.  A pick that works for me, probably won’t work for you in the same lock – you have to evolve your own style and technique.

Sparrows Tron
But more specifically…I’d just like to see more manufacturers do the basics very, very well. A standard six pin lock made to good tolerances and with a few security pins plus a tight paracentric keyway provides FAR more security than the average domestic or commercial consumer is ever going to need…and costs very little more to make than a lock with a wide open keyway and standard pins. Which is easier to pick? A German six pin DOM, or a six pin Lockwood with a C4 keyway?  I’d be willing to bet that the DOM costs barely a few cents more than the Lockwood to produce.

I’ve never even seen one, only heard about them.  This is one of the best things about lockpicking – no matter how good you get, there’s always one more difficult lock to beat…