Lock bumping & bump Keys – what you need to know

Australian Bump Keys
Posted by: Lockie Category: Tips Tags: , , , , , Post Date: 29/03/2017

Lock bumping & bump Keys – what you need to know

It’s been around since the 1950s. And yet media outlets have only recently exposed the threat of lock bumping to the public.

Here in Australia, A Current Affair ran an exposé to show homeowners just how easy it is to break in using some simple tools and skills – and without leaving any signs of forced entry. ACA interviewed a professional locksmith whose advice was to scrap the old pin tumbler and use a code, fingerprint, or alarm-based system instead. Even though they come with a hefty price tag.

Here’s our take on lock bumping:

What is lock bumping?

Lock bumping is a technique you can use to open a pin tumbler lock. You need a bump key (also called a 999 or rapping key) and a bump hammer.

TOOOL (The Open Organisation of Lock Pickers) goes even further and says lock bumping is a technique used to open a range of mechanical locks without detection.

The bump key is cut to match the lock. And because all the cuts in the key are at a max depth, it can open almost any lock.

How do you lock bump?

It’s easy to do (with a bit of practice and the right tools). You simply put the bump key into the keyhole and tap the end of the key with the hammer. This forces the lock pins to go above the shear line. In an instant, the pins line up perfectly and you can turn the key to open the lock.

As you can see, it’s a simple skill to learn, which means almost anyone can learn to open a lock – sometimes in under 20 seconds! And given that around 90% of homes use old cylinder locks, we can understand why homeowners are concerned about their security.

If you buy a bump key and hammer, you’ll see for yourself how quick and easy it is to open almost any lock. So you might want to go and upgrade your home’s security – and tell all your family and friends!

Is lock bumping legal?

 Learning to pick locks isn’t illegal. But it is against the law to pick any lock that you shouldn’t open. And you KNOW which ones you shouldn’t open. So be sure to stick to the ‘lock pickers code of conduct’ and only bump locks as a hobby at home – not to commit a crime.

Download our free eBook Lock picking laws, legality and you to get the full low-down. (Coming Soon!)